CRC Articles and Fire Australia Editions

Fire Australia is a joint publication of the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, AFAC and the Fire Protection Association Australia. You can subscribe to receive email editions as they are published.

Fire Australia aims to bring the latest news, developments and technical information to emergency services, natural hazards researchers and the fire protection industry. Fire Australia is produced quarterly and is distributed throughout Australia and New Zealand.

CRC Articles

Ngarkat, Sth Australia, fire and smoke
New fire modelling software, teaching kids about bushfire and research on Cyclone Debbie are all covered in the latest edition of Fire Australia.
For the first time, emergency services and police across Australia will be surveyed about their mental health and wellbeing
A new direction of natural hazards research is set to begin, with nine new research projects from the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
Future versions of Amicus will hopefully include a searchable database, allowing comparisons with historical fires, such as Black Saturday (pictured), in similar conditions. Photo: Country Fire Authority
New prediction software developed by CSIRO is helping to combine the complex science of fire behaviour prediction with the expert knowledge needed to fill in the gaps.
Photo: NSW Rural Fire Service
School curriculum changes have made the study of bushfire impacts compulsory for NSW primary students in Year 5 and 6, giving fire agencies a unique opportunity to improve community resilience
An aerial shot of the damage from the Margaret River fire in 2011
Prescribed burning can be a highly effective bushfire mitigation strategy, but despite good science, planning and practice, it is an inherently risky business.
Photo: NSW State Emergency Service
CRC research is investigating the impacts of Cyclone Debbie and helping to inform mitigation and resilience to severe wind
Fire Australia Issue Two 2017
There is plenty of CRC science in the latest edition of Fire Australia.
Margaret River Fire
One of the most challenging situations in fire management is when relatively non-threatening weather conditions are expected, but a severe fire eventuates.
Research shows that the most common way people are killed during a flood is when they attempt to cross a bridge or flooded road. Photo: Dana Fairhead
CRC research into where, why and how Australians are dying in floods is helping to increase flood safety and awareness.
Steve Sutton inspects the remains of a house on Simeulue smashed by the 2004 tsunami
From a young age, people on northern Indonesia's Simeuleu Island learn that when the earth shakes, run to the hills. What can we learn from Simeulue, and how can we make disaster preparation normal in Australia?
SES volunteers undertaking a search.
Finding out why volunteers leave - and developing ways to improve volunteer retention—has been the focus of CRC research.
BlazeAid volunteers
Emergency services want to build ‘resilience’ into communities. A CRC researcher has developed a way to teach it to students.
Research into how Australian children are involved in bushfire preparations around the home is being applied to disaster preparedness in the slum communities of Bangladesh.
Fire Australia cover
Firestorms, disaster resilience and fire preparation in Bangladesh are featured in the latest edition of Fire Australia magazine, with Issue One for 2017 out now.

Pages

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

Index of Editions

Issue Three of Fire Australia for 2017 features new prediction software for predictions of bushfire spread, how NSW's geography curriculum allows students to become agents of change for community resilience, suggestions for reducing the risks involved in prescribed burning, research on the impacts of severe wind during Cyclone Debbie, and new natural hazards science at the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
Issue Two of Fire Australia for 2017 features information about a weather phenomena called a mountain wave that produces severe fire behaviour, an analysis of flood fatalities in Australia, what we can learn about disaster preparation from Indonesia, and leadership for our emergency service volunteers.
Issue One of Fire Australia for 2017 features firestorms, disaster resilience, fire preparation in Bangladesh and the International Day for Disaster Reduction.
PhD progress, human factors and decision-making capabilities, asbestos risk and the role of pharmacies in disasters are showcased in the Spring 2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine.
The Winter 2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine highlights important research including reducing hazard impacts with smarter spending, fire modelling and wind behaviour as well as the rewarding experience of PhD student placements in the sector.
Mitigating disasters: how damage from floods, fires and storms can be prevented through careful planning and investment; a new approach to flood forecasting using remote sensing data; and case studies from the CRC are highlighting paths to integrate bushfire science into government policy and planning.
Developing a smartphone app to measure fuels for bushfire, 2015's International Day for Disaster Reduction, a case study on the Be Ready Warrandyte initiative and a look at what could happen if Adelaide was hit by a large earthquake.
Community resilience in the remote north, how NSW RFS used research to change their approach to engagement around bushfire survival planning, and case studies on CRC research impact.
How extreme water levels could impact Australia's coasts and what can be done to mitigate the risks, the gulf in earthquake risk reduction, and a look at the milestone UN Sendai conference on risk reduction.
The vital elements of operational fire modelling and retrofitting older homes for severe wind events.